Rural Communities Opioid Response Program-Implementation

Photo: Roadsidepictures/FlickrCC

Successful RCORP-Implementation award recipients will receive up to $1 million for a three-year period of performance to enhance and expand substance use disorder (SUD), including opioid use disorder (OUD), service delivery in high-risk rural communities. Award recipients will implement a set of core SUD/OUD prevention, treatment, and recovery activities that align with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Five-Point Strategy to Combat the Opioid Crisis (PDF – 76 KB). Award recipients are encouraged to leverage workforce recruiting mechanisms like the National Health Service Corps (NHSC). Find out how to become a NHSC site.

All domestic public and private entities, nonprofit and for-profit, will be eligible to apply and all services must be provided in HRSA-designated rural areas (as defined by the Rural Health Grants Eligibility Analyzer). Applicants do not need to be current or former RCORP-Planning award recipients to apply for this funding opportunity.

The applicant organization must be part of an established network or consortium that includes at least three other separately-owned (i.e., different Employment Identification Numbers) entities. At least two of these entities must be located in a HRSA-designated rural area.

RCORP is a multi-year initiative by HRSA aimed at supporting treatment for and prevention of SUD/OUD. In FY18, HRSA awarded 95 grants to rural communities under the RCORP-Planning initiative and funded a technical assistance center to support RCORP award recipients. In FY19, in addition to the RCORP-Implementation awards, HRSA anticipates awarding a new round of RCORP-Planning grants and launching a pilot grant program aimed at expanding the number of small rural hospitals and clinics that provide medication-assisted treatment.

HRSA plans to award approximately 75 grants to rural communities as part of this funding opportunity.

 

New Guide Helps Smoking Cessation Efforts in Substance Abuse Programs

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The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has released a new guide to help health professionals with tobacco cessation efforts.

The guide, Implementing Tobacco Cessation Programs in Substance Use Disorder Treatment Settings – A Quick Guide for Program Directors and Clinicians, is now available for free download.

The new guide notes research that found cigarette smoking is very common among people with substance use problems. Past-month smoking was reported by 74 percent of people ages 12 and older who received SUD treatment in the past year—a rate approximately three times higher than that for people who did not receive treatment in the same period.

The rate of tobacco-related deaths is substantially higher for people who have received SUD treatment services compared with the general population.

But less than half of all U.S. substance use disorder treatment facilities offer tobacco cessation services.

Download the guide now. For more information visit the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration website.

2019 NHSC Substance Use Disorder Workforce Loan Repayment Programs

The National Health Service Corps (NHSC) seeks clinicians who want to serve the nation’s underserved rural, urban and tribal communities.

To combat the nation’s opioid crisis, the Substance Use Disorder Workforce Loan Repayment Program (SUD Workforce LRP) offers eligible clinicians up to $75,000 in student loan repayment in exchange for a three-year commitment to provide substance use disorder treatment services at NHSC-approved sites.

This program is available to more professionals, including pharmacists and registered nurses. For more information, refer to the fact sheet and 2019 Application and Program Guidance (NHSC SUD Workforce LRP) (PDF – 573 KB).

APPLY HERE

Are you eligible?

Approved sites are located across the U.S., in both urban and rural areas. Visit the Health Workforce Connector to see if your current employer is already approved which then makes you eligible to apply for loan repayment.

Accepting applications through Thursday,

February 21, 7:30 p.m. ET

Application Help

NHSC LRP & SUD Workforce LRP Application Q & A Session #2 (online & by phone)

Thursday, February 7
2:30 – 3:30 PM ET
Webinar Access Link
Dial-in: 888-950-7563
Passcode: 3172361

For questions, call 1-800-221-9393 (TTY: 1-877-897-9910) Monday through Friday (except federal holidays) 8:00 am to 8:00 pm ET.

 

Primary Care Training and Enhancement: Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care Program

NOTICE OF FUNDING OPPORTUNITY (HRSA-19-086) Fiscal Year 2019 Application Due Date: January 28, 2019

Apply for this grant on Grants.gov.

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is accepting applications for the fiscal year (FY) 2019 Primary Care Training and Enhancement (PCTE): Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care (IBHPC) funding opportunity. The application cycle closes on January 28, 2019.

The purpose of this program is to fund innovative training programs that integrate behavioral health care into primary care, particularly in rural and under-served settings with a special emphasis on the treatment of opioid use disorder.

This program supports HRSA’s priority around combating the opioid crisis, as well as priorities around enhancing access to mental health services, by transforming the health workforce.

Applicants are tasked with enhancing primary care training using the Framework for Levels of Integrated Healthcare, establishing or enhancing training in opioid and other substance use disorders and developing and implementing a systematic approach to improve trainee and provider wellness.

Approximately $4 million will be awarded to fund up to 10 grants. Applicants can apply for up to $250,000 per year for single projects and up to 400,000 for collaborative projects per year.

Behavioral Health Workforce Projections

New HRSA Reports: Behavioral Health Workforce Projections and Estimates of New Entrants

HRSA’s National Center for Health Workforce Analysis recently conducted analyses on the adult and pediatric mental health and substance abuse disorder workforce.

We generated national-level projection estimates for the health workforce for the following behavioral health occupations between 2016 and 2030:

We also generated state-level projections of supply and demand for behavioral health occupations from 2016 to 2030.

We estimated the number of new entrants into the behavioral health workforce between 2016 and 2021.

 

More information is available on the Behavioral Health Workforce Analysis web page.

This Proposal Would Help Hospitals in West Virginia Treat Drug Overdoses

Photo: FlickrCC

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The National Rural Health Association has thrown its support behind a new proposal to provide more resources and guidelines for rural hospitals help people treated for a drug overdose.

Rep. David McKinley (R-WV) and Rep. Mike Doyle (D-PA), have introduced a bill in the U.S. Congress – H.R. 5176, the Preventing Overdoses While in Emergency Rooms (POWER) Act – that would provide competitive grants for emergency departments in areas with high overdose rates.

These grants would allow qualifying facilities to hire recovery coaches, counselors, social workers and other professionals specializing in the treatment of substance abuse disorder, establish policies and procedures for the provision of overdose reversal medication, and increase the availability and access of medication-assisted treatment and other evidence-based treatment, among other things.

The legislation would also require the development of protocols for discharging patients who treated for a drug overdose and enhance the integration and coordination of care and treatment options for individuals with substance use disorder after they are discharged.

The National Rural Health Association wrote to both representatives last week to express our support for H.R. 5176.

This critical legislation provides preference for rural facilities, specifically Critical Access Hospitals, Sole Community Hospitals, and Low Volume Hospitals, in the grant process. Currently, 82.5 percent of rural counties do not have a single doctor with the ability to provide MAT, these communities are unable to access this crucial resource on the path to recovery.

You can learn more about the bill at www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/115/hr5176

To learn more about the National Rural Health Association and it’s legislative advocacy, visit www.ruralhealthweb.org

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