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Marshall University has partnered with Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes), to assist primary care providers in their treatment of endocrinology and cardiology issues.

The goal of this program is to increase the capacity of primary care providers to safely and effectively treat chronic, common, and complex conditions associated with endocrinology and cardiology issues.

The ECHO clinic is held the first Tuesday of each month at 12 p.m., with alternating endocrinology and cardiology sessions. Participants who join teleECHO clinics receive free CME for the total time spent participating, including didactics and patient-case presentations.

For more information and to register for ECHO clinics, contact Jennifer Plymale at plymale@marshall.edu.

Project ECHO is a collaborative model of medical education and care management that empowers clinicians everywhere to provide better care to more people, right where they live.

The ECHO model aims to increase access to specialty treatment in rural and underserved areas by providing front-line clinicians with the knowledge and support they need to manage patients with complex conditions such as: hepatitis C, HIV, tuberculosis, chronic pain, endocrinology, behavioral health disorders, and many others.

It does this by engaging clinicians in a continuous learning system and partnering them with specialist mentors at an academic medical center or hub. As the ECHO model expands, it is helping to address some of the healthcare system’s most intractable problems, including inadequate or disparities in access to care, rising costs, systemic inefficiencies, and unequal or slow diffusion of best practices.

To learn more about Project ECHO visit echo.unm.edu/about-echo/

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